Learning Resources

An important part of all of our Challenges is to create opportunities for student learning in three ways; learning about self, learning about others, and learning about root causes of an issue. Each year we curate and create different resources that help you do just that!

Explore and choose to engage these resources as makes sense for your team. Feel free create your own resources and to adapt the information to the learning goals of your classroom or program.

  1. Engagement Roadmaps
  2. Project-Based Learning Units
  3. Virtual Reality Experience & Resource Guide (COMING SOON!)
  4. Videos and Supporting Lessons
  5. Other Recommended Resources

Engagement Roadmaps

While you can always customize your engagement to meet your team’s needs, if you are new to Students Rebuild, or just looking for some guidance about how to approach the Challenge with your team, we have created the following roadmaps to help.

How much time do you have? What type of Challenge experience do you want to have with your team? Your answer should help you find the right format for your Challenge. Follow the links to the roadmap that best fits your needs!

Project-Based Learning Units from the Buck Institute for Education & Informed by Students Rebuild Teachers

This year we are pleased to offer our most robust curriculum ever through our partnership with the Buck Institute for Education (BIE). BIE has developed two project based learning units that were informed by a selection of Students Rebuild teachers and written by their National Faculty uniquely for the Facing Difference Challenge.

Peace by Piece is a Project Based Learning (PBL) unit designed to engage students in leadership through advocacy for peaceful solutions to local or community conflicts. In Peace Teams, students delve deeply into a local peacebuilding needs and design a solution. International examples of peacebuilding efforts will be used to inform team solutions. Students will advocate for their peaceful proposal to a public audience of stakeholders such as other students, school leadership, and community members during a student-led Peace Summit. The standards focus of this interdisciplinary unit is grade 3; however, the content strands (e.g., narrative writing) are such that educators can adapt this project for grades K - 6 in any context, including international ones. This unit includes both educator planning and student-facing resources. 

For all educators using Peace by Piece, please share your contact details so we can stay in contact with you. You can do so here.

In the project, Advocates for Peace, students explore peacebuilding efforts around the world and conduct research on local issues. After identifying a local issue, project teams design a policy proposal for a possible solution and present their thinking to a relevant audience of community members and key stakeholders whom they hope to move to action. This solution is grounded in successful international examples of peacebuilding and tailored to the community it is intended to serve. Though the standards focus of Advocates for Peace is grades 9-10, the content strands (e.g., argumentative writing) were selected so that educators could adapt this project anywhere along the 7 - 12 span and in any context, including international ones. This unit includes both educator planning and student-facing resources.

For all educators using Advocates for Peace, please share your contact details so we can stay in contact with you. You can do so here

Videos & Supporting Lessons from Global Nomads Group

Mariya and Juilana’s Story: Facing Religious Differences (Grades 4–12)

In Mariya and Juliana’s Story, we learn about the conflict between Muslims and Christians in Jos, Nigeria a country located in West Africa. The conflict between Christians and Muslims in Nigeria dates back to the 1950s, but for Mariya and Juliana, the conflict in 2008 directly affected their lives.

A classroom discussion and activity guide related to this video is available for: Grades 4-5 and Grades 6-12

Aska and Nino’s Story: Facing Immigration (Grades 4–12)

In Aska and Nino’s story, we meet two friends who live in Georgia, a country located where the Asian and European continents meet. Georgia has about 3.7 million inhabitants, 87% of whom identify as Georgian. The largest immigrant population in Georgia immigrated from neighboring Azerbaijan and comprises 6.5% of the total population. Nino was born in Georgia. Aska and her family are Azerbaijani immigrants, also referred to as Azeri. The story of Aska and Nino shows what it is like to embrace difference and forge friendships within the historical, social, economic, and political arrangements that shape our perceptions of each other.

A classroom discussion and activity guide related to this video is available for: Grades 4-5 and Grades 6-12

 

Other Recommended Resources

We have also created a detailed learning resource chart with links to other wonderful curriculum resources from well-respected institutions such as Facing History and Ourselves, Teaching Tolerance, and Peace First.

Virtual Reality (VR) Experience and Resource Guide from Global Nomads Group (Grades 4-12) 

(Coming October 2017!)

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to walk a day in the life of in someone else’s shoes? This VR experience begins as you wake up in
your bedroom for what seems to be an ordinary day ahead. As you move about your day, questions around your identity unfold. The experience
ends as you come face to face with your own reflection.